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Vampire on the loose in Serbia? They can’t all be in Washington DC!

2012 December 1
by Worldwide Hippies

WWH/CJE – With the possible exception of my ex-wife, I’ve never met a true bloodsucker. But this story keeps coming up from my news feeds. So it was this story or John Boehner makes deal with Dems. This was far more believable.

vsalon.com – In this Nov. 30, 2012 photo, the interior of recently collapsed old watermill located on the Rogacica river which was believed to have been Sava Savanovic’s home, in the village of Zarozje, near the Serbian town of Bajina Basta. Get your garlic, wooden crosses and stakes ready: a bloodsucking vampire is on the loose. Or so say villagers in the tiny western Serbian hamlet of Zarozje, nestled between the lush green mountain slopes and spooky thick forests. Rumors that a legendary vampire ghost has returned are spreading panic throughout the town. An official warning telling villagers to put garlic in their pockets and place wooden crosses in each of their rooms, the tools that should keep away the vampires did nothing but fuel the fear. “The story of Sava Savanovic is a legend, but strange things did occur in these parts back in the old days,” said 55-year-old housewife Milka Prokic, holding a string of onions in one hand and a large wooden stake in another. The story goes that back in the old days, vampires would roam around and show themselves in different forms, as a butterfly, or as a hay stack, they would change form,” she said as mist settled on the pristine valley and the full moon appeared in the sky. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)(Credit: AP)

ZAROZJE, Serbia (AP) — Get your garlic, crosses and stakes ready: a bloodsucking vampire is on the loose.

Or so say villagers in the tiny western Serbian hamlet of Zarozje, nestled between lush green mountain slopes and spooky thick forests. They say that rumors that a legendary vampire ghost has awakened are spreading fear — and a potential tourist opportunity — through the remote village.

A local council warned villagers to put garlic in their pockets and place wooden crosses in their rooms to ward off vampires, although it appeared designed more to attract visitors to the impoverished region bordering Bosnia.

Many of the villagers are aware that Sava Savanovic, Serbia’s most famous vampire, is a fairy tale. Still, they say, better to take it seriously than risk succumbing to the vampire’s fangs.

“The story of Sava Savanovic is a legend, but strange things did occur in these parts back in the old days,” said 55-year-old housewife Milka Prokic, holding a string of garlic in one hand and a large wooden stake in another, as an appropriately moody mist rose above the surrounding hills. “We have inherited this legend from our ancestors, and we keep it alive for the younger generations.”

Vampire legends have played a prominent part in the Balkans for centuries — most prominently Dracula from Romania’s Transylvania region. In the 18th century, the legends sometimes triggered mass hysteria and even public executions of those accused of being vampires. Read more…

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